5 Skin Myths Busted

  1. Pores can open and close. We’ve all heard the old wives tales that splashing your face with freezing cold water “opens up your pores”. The truth is, pores are not attached to any muscle so they neither expand nor contract. Cold water can lessen your pores’ oil production, but won’t lessen their size. Alternatively, when a facialist uses steam to “open your pores” what is really happening is that the sebum is loosened and oil production stimulated so that what’s clogging your pores is more easily extractable.
  2. Chocolate and French fries cause acne. Breakouts are caused by an increased production in sebum, or oil, from your skin. Food has no effect on the production of your skin’s oil; acne is caused by hormones. That’s not to say that a diet of greasy food has no consequences. There have been studies and opinions that eating too much sugar, dairy, wheat and/or carbohydrates cause digestive issues, and, in turn, acne. If you have severe digestive issues and are breaking out, you may want to talk to your doctor and get a food allergy test.
  3. Lip balms are addictive. If you find yourself applying your lip balm every 20 minutes it’s not because you have developed an unhealthy addiction to an ingredient in your lip balm. Instead, you are merely addicted to the feel of wearing something moisturizing on your lips. The skin on your lips is thin and sensitive to weather changes, dehydration and even licking your lips often, all of which may cause chapping. Applying something emollient to your lips simply feels good. This is one “addiction” that’s not bad for you, so enjoy!
  4. The higher the SPF, the better the protection. To all those that reach for the SPF 50 before going out in the sun, you might want to read this. Experts recommend choosing a sunscreen with an SPF between 15-30, depending on your skin color. Fair skin wearers should choose a sunscreen with an SPF 25-30, whereas darker skinned individuals should wear an SPF 15. Choosing an SPF of 50 over a SPF 30 only provides you with about 1-2% more SPF protection, but with a lot more chemical ingredients that go on your skin. And no, an SPF 30 does not let you sunbathe for 30 times longer. SPF protection depends on a variety of factors, including time of day. Choose an SPF suitable for your skin type and make sure your sunscreen has “broad spectrum” protection which will help to block all types of UV rays. Make sure you apply a generous amount and reapply every 2 hours no matter how long lasting your sunscreen advertises it is. Try Colorescience Sunforgettable powder sunscreen. It’s an SPF 30 in a powder form that’s waterproof, rub-proof, sweat-proof and super easy to apply. Plus there are 2 tinted shades to add a bit of color and glow to your skin. Bottom line: the days of lying out with baby oil are over. Sun damage is real, dangerous and irreversible. Be careful!
  5. Expensive skin care products are better. I am a firm believer in finding the ultimate bargain, and the same goes for my skin care. However, some of my favorite and most effective products cost a little more than others. It’s really important to read the ingredients and know what is actually in your skin care product. Look for a product with the least amount of unnecessary additives (one example: sodium lauryl sulfate is a detergent added to face cleansers to produce lather and foam. It’s really drying, strips moisture and may cause skin irritation). Familiarize yourself with which ingredients actually do what their supposed to do and how high the concentration needs to be to actually have an effect. Look for clinical skin care lines that generally have not only a higher concentration of active ingredients but also a higher grade of quality. These may cost a little more but you’re getting more bang for your buck. For example, it is scientifically proven that Retinoid, found in Retin-A, helps reduce wrinkles. But the Retinoid or Retinol listed as the sixth ingredient on that $5 moisturizer is probably not enough to have any effect. Scrimp on the products that don’t stay on your skin for too long and aren’t being used for long term effects on your skin. Use an inexpensive blush but splurge on that anti-aging, anti-wrinkle serum. IS Clinical is a brand I trust. It costs a little more but the line contains high grade, high potency ingredients that really do what their supposed to. The IS Clinical Active Serum is a great example and since you only use a few drops, the 1oz bottle lasts a long time.
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6 Responses to 5 Skin Myths Busted

  1. Karen Halls says:

    I found your site on google blog search and read a few of your other posts. Keep up the good work. Just added your RSS feed to my feed reader. Look forward to reading more from you.

    Karen Halls

  2. Pingback: www.myskincarediary.info » 5 Skin Myths Busted

  3. Marisa says:

    Very helpful info! I especially like how the article discusses the importance of knowing what’s in our skin care products (for instance, beware of sodium lauryl sulfate!) Thanks for the helpful tips and love the site!

  4. Shannon says:

    You must must must use antioxidants in combination with a high SPF to fight off the agin effects of the sun and pollution. I completely agree that spending a little more is worth it! iS CLINICAL can be found with 120% price protection and free shipping on orders of $100 or more at http://www.AgelessApple.com but be sure not to buy from unauthorized sellers (ebay) because you do not want to spend money of fraudulent or water downed products. Also http://www.AgelessApple.com gives a portion of profit to animals in need and only sells cruelty free products.

  5. Bridgett says:

    I loved your blog !! We must have the same tastes. I had 75% of the items you posted. I have some #9 musk on the way. Never bought perfume without smelling it first! Thanks for taking the time.

    Bridgett in Tennessee

  6. Bridgett says:

    Hi Bridgett! So glad you enjoy the same products I do. I know you will love the perfume!

    Enjoy!

    Mia

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